The News
The News
Tuesday 02 of March 2021

UAEM Specialist: Half of Mexican Jaguars Live in Yucatan Peninsula


José Cuauhtémoc Chávez Tovar gives conference on jaguars,photo: Courtesy of UAEM
José Cuauhtémoc Chávez Tovar gives conference on jaguars,photo: Courtesy of UAEM
Chávez Tovar said that in order to protect the Mexican jaguar population, non-government organizations and the government are creating conservation programs at the state level

Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEM) specialist José Cuauhtémoc Chávez Tovar said that between 1,800 and 2,000 adult jaguars live in the Yucatan Peninsula. This represents 50 percent of the total Mexican jaguar population. The other 2,000 specimens live throughout 23 other states of Mexico.

During his conference titled “The Jaguar in Mexico and its Conservation on the Yucatan Penisula,” as part of the International Biology Conservation Symposium: Great Mexican Predators, Chávez Tovar said that the jaguar is a key species for the ecology and culture of the country. The conference was organized by the Applied Biology Sciences Investigation Center (CICBA), the Natural Parks and Fauna State Commission (Cepanaf) and the State of Mexico Science and Technology Council (Comecyt).

The specialist said that the first national Jaguar National Census took place from 2007-2010, with the objective of having an up-to-date database for the number of jaguar specimens to better appreciate the successes and failures of jaguar conservation.

Chávez Tovar said that in order to protect the Mexican jaguar population, non-government organizations and the government are creating conservation programs at the state level. However, currently only Campeche has implemented the program.