The News
The News
Saturday 03 of December 2022

The CNDH Offers Advice on Mexico’s New Internal Security Law


CNDH president, Luis Raúl González Pérez (L), with the ex-ambassador of the United States to Mexico, Earl Anthony Wayne (R),photo: United States Embassy in Mexico
CNDH president, Luis Raúl González Pérez (L), with the ex-ambassador of the United States to Mexico, Earl Anthony Wayne (R),photo: United States Embassy in Mexico
The National Human Rights Commission has released a document detailing its beliefs on the new ruling

The National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) has warned that the Internal Security Law to be approved by the Congress of the Union should not restrict or limit the legitimate right to protest, freedom of expression and freedom of mobility.

The Senate received a document titled “Considerations Regarding Legislative Proposals About the Issuance of an Internal Security Law in Mexico,” from the CNDH.

In the document, CNDH said that the legislation asks for at least 10 relevant points to call upon the Armed Forces for public security tasks.

The CNDH said that security linked to individuals must be carried out by civil institutions and that the armed forces must return, when the conditions of the country so permit, to their usual function. This must occur under a gradual and verifiable program, it said.

Their participation in personal security, especially in their interaction with the civilian population, should not be assumed to be permanent or be promoted as such.

The law must recognize and respect the dignity of individuals. Authorities have an obligation to promote, respect, protect and guarantee human rights, it said.

It also said that the law must distinguish the concepts of public security, national security and internal security, and prevent the armed forces from participating in crime prevention and investigation.