Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
World

NASA Spacecraft Halfway Between Pluto and Next Smaller Stop

With another 466 million miles (750 million kilometers) remaining, New Horizons will go into a five-month hibernation later this week

This image made available by NASA on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 shows Pluto illuminated from behind by the sun as the New Horizons spacecraft travels away from it at a distance of about 120,000 miles (200,000 kilometers), photo: NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, via AP
3 months ago

CAPE CANAVERAL – NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is now halfway between Pluto and its next much, much smaller stop.

New Horizons — which reached the milestone this week — is bound for an even more remote object called 2014 MU69. Like Pluto, the object orbits in our solar system’s twilight zone known as the Kuiper Belt, but is barely 1 percent its size. MU69 is nearly 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto.

The spacecraft will swoop past MU69 on Jan. 1, 2019.

“That flyby will set the record for the most distant world ever explored in the history of civilization,” chief investigator Alan Stern of Southwest Research Institute said in a statement.

With another 466 million miles (750 million kilometers) remaining, New Horizons will go into a five-month hibernation later this week.

Although still zooming along, the spacecraft is slowing down slightly as it gets farther from the sun. Besides aiming for MU69, New Horizons will study a couple dozen other Kuiper Belt objects from afar.

New Horizons arrived at Pluto in July 2015, becoming its first visitor from Earth. It launched from Cape Canaveral in 2006.

The spacecraft is currently 3.5 billion miles (5.7 billion kilometers) from home. It takes radio signals five hours and 20 minutes to reach the spacecraft from the control center at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) in Laurel, Maryland.

MARCIA DUNN

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Sports

Red Sox Retire No. 34 for David Ortiz

11 hours ago
Business

Sears Closes Another 20 Stores

11 hours ago
World

Ivanka Trump Ordered to Testify in Dispu ...

12 hours ago
World

U.S. Would Welcome Effective Syrian Effo ...

12 hours ago
Most Popular

McConnell's Focus: Finding Votes for Sen ...

By The Associated Press
World

Cholera Suspected as Several ill at Keny ...

By The Associated Press
World

Federal Government Launches Program to P ...

By Notimex
World

At Least 40 People Killed in Bomb, Gun A ...

By The Associated Press
World

Britain, EU Clash Over Brexit Proposals ...

By The Associated Press
World