The News

WWW.THENEWS.MX

Saturday 15, August 2020
Capital Coahuila
Capital Querétaro
Capital Edo. de Méx.
Capital México
Capital Mujer
Reporte Índigo
Estadio Deportes
The News
Efekto
Green TV
Revista Cambio
  • Radio Capital
  • Pirata FM
  • Capital Máxima
  • Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV

Nobel Institute: Myanmar Leader Can't be Stripped of Prize

An online petition signed by more than 386,000 people on Change.org is calling for Suu Kyi to be stripped of her Peace Prize over the persecution of Myanmar's Rohingya Muslim minority
By The News · 08 of September 2017 09:09:33
A Muslim man displays a defaced poster of Myanmar's State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi during a rally against the persecution of Rohingya Muslims outside the Myanmar's Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, No available, photo: AP/Tatan Syuflana

COPENHAGEN, Denmark – The organization that oversees the Nobel Peace Prize said Friday the 1991 prize awarded to Myanmar’s Aung Sang Suu Kyi cannot be revoked.

Olav Njolstad, head of the Norwegian Nobel Institute said in an email to press associations that neither the will of prize founder Alfred Nobel nor the Nobel Foundation’s rules provide for the possibility of withdrawing the honor from laureates.

“It is not possible to strip a Nobel Peace Prize laureate of his or her award once bestowed,” Njolstad wrote. “None of the prize awarding committees in Stockholm and Oslo has ever considered revoking a prize after it has been awarded.”

An online petition signed by more than 386,000 people on Change.org is calling for Suu Kyi to be stripped of her Peace Prize over the persecution of Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslim minority.

Suu Kyi received the award for “her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights” while standing up against military rulers.

She became the country’s de facto leader after Myanmar held its first free election in 2012 and she led her party to a landslide victory.

On Thursday, former South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu urged her to intervene to stop the persecution of the Rohingya. In an open letter, he told his fellow Nobel Peace Prize winner that it is “incongruous for a symbol of righteousness” to lead a country where violence against the Rohingya is being carried out.

Rohingya have described large-scale violence perpetrated by Myanmar troops and Buddhist mobs — setting fire to their homes, spraying bullets indiscriminately and ordering them to leave or be killed.

Suu Kyi has dismissed the Rohingya crisis as a misinformation campaign.