The News
The News
Sunday 24 of January 2021

Barrio Alameda Offers 'Te Prometo Anarquía' Showing and Cocktails


Barrio Alameda exterior,photo: Courtesy of Barrio Alameda
Barrio Alameda exterior,photo: Courtesy of Barrio Alameda
The celebration included five days of music, art, film, drink and food activities open to the public

As part of its second anniversary celebrations, Barrio Alameda held a screening of 2015 award-winning Mexican film “Te prometo anarquía” by director Julio Hernández Cordón. The film follows the story of childhood friends and lovers Miguel and Johnny who find themselves in over their heads when they begin selling blood on the black market.

The event began with cocktails served by Mezcalería Mundana and ended with a short Q&A with the director and actors.

Barrio Alameda interior. Photo: Courtesy of Barrio Alameda

After the film, The News was able to ask the two leading actors Eduardo Eliseo Martínez (Johnny) Diego Calva Hernández (Miguel) and a few questions about their experience:

What was the process like behind creating the relationship we see onscreen?

Eliseo Martínez: I think that the relationship between our characters in the movie works because they have known each other since they were really young. Johnny’s mother has worked in Miguel’s house as far as he can remember, so they have known each other for a long time. They shared toys, played together, and eventually they realize that they like each other romantically. It’s a relationship between two human beings.

Calva Hernández: I don’t see the characters’ relationship as merely sexual. I think this is a movie about love, and although it touches upon the theme of homosexuality, it doesn’t treat it in a clichéd way. It’s a story about two best friends whose relationship becomes one of love, and that is beautiful.

In honor of LGBTQ Pride Month, is there anything you would like to say to the LGBTQ community?

Eliseo Martínez: At the end of the day I think that we don’t really need to use labels for separate people, because love is a feeling that everyone feels, and at the end of the day it’s just human beings that matter.

Calva Hernández: Yeah, people divided are weaker and there shouldn’t be so many labels, that way we can be stronger.

Screenshot of “Te prometo anarquía.” Photo: Vimeo

The celebration included five days of music, art, film, drink and food activities open to the public.