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Under Trump change, Cuba business partners can now be sued

By The News · 04 of May 2019 22:37:26
AP Photo,, No available, FILE - In this Sept. 1, 2014 file photo, people put their luggage in a private taxi as they arrive from the U.S. to the Jose Marti International Airport in Havana, Cuba. In 1958, the father of José Ramón López owned Cuba's main airport, its national airline and three small hotels. All were taken in Cuba's socialist revolution. Starting Thursday, they will be able to file lawsuits against European and American companies doing business on their former properties, thanks to the Trump administration's decision to activate a provision of the U.S. embargo on Cuba with the potential to affect foreign investment in Cuba for many years to come. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa, File)

MIAMI (AP) — People who lost properties after the Cuban revolution hope that, starting Thursday, they will be able to sue European and American companies doing business on their former properties.

That’s thanks to the Trump administration’s decision to activate a provision of the U.S. embargo on Cuba with the potential to affect foreign investment in Cuba for years to come.

Known as Title III of the 1996 Helms-Burton Act, the section allows Americans, and Cubans who later become Americans, to sue almost any company deemed to be “trafficking” in property confiscated by Cuba’s government. Every president since the law’s passage has suspended Title III because of objections from U.S. allies doing business in Cuba and because of the potential effect on future negotiated settlements between the U.S. and Cuba.