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Some driverless car damage appears to be from angry people

One problem with self-driving cars is people. The Los Angeles Times reports that of six crash reports filed in California so far this year, two involved a person attacking a robot car. Both incidents happened in San Francisco. One vehicle was waiting for pedestrians to cross a street when a man ran up and struck its left rear, damaging a taillight. Another time, a robotic vehicle with a human driving had stopped behind a taxi when the taxi driver got out and slapped a window.
By The News · 06 of March 2018 19:07:37
FILE - In this Tuesday, June 13, 2017, file photo, a self-driving Chevrolet Bolt EV that is in General Motors Co.'s autonomous vehicle development program appears on display at GM's Orion Assembly in Lake Orion, Mich. One problem with self-driving cars is people. The Los Angeles Times reports that of six crash reports filed in California in 2018, two involved a person attacking a robot car. Both incidents happened in San Francisco, according to Department of Motor Vehicles records. (Jose Juarez/Detroit News via AP, File), No available, FILE - In this Tuesday, June 13, 2017, file photo, a self-driving Chevrolet Bolt EV that is in General Motors Co.'s autonomous vehicle development program appears on display at GM's Orion Assembly in Lake Orion, Mich. One problem with self-driving cars is people. The Los Angeles Times reports that of six crash reports filed in California in 2018, two involved a person attacking a robot car. Both incidents happened in San Francisco, according to Department of Motor Vehicles records. (Jose Juarez/Detroit News via AP, File)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One problem with self-driving cars is people.

The Los Angeles Times reports that of six crash reports filed in California so far this year, two involved a person attacking a robot car.

Both incidents happened in San Francisco, according to Department of Motor Vehicles records.

On Jan. 2, a vehicle operated by General Motors’ Cruise driverless car division was waiting at a green light for pedestrians to cross when a shouting man ran across the street against the do-not-walk signal and struck its bumper and hatch, damaging a taillight.

The car was in autonomous mode but a driver was behind the wheel.

On Jan. 28, another GM autonomous vehicle with a human driving had stopped behind a taxi when the taxi driver got out and slapped the front passenger-side window.

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Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com/