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CDC get $480 million to replace lab for deadliest germs

The nation's top public health agency is getting $480 million to build a new state-of-the-art lab to handle the world's most dangerous germs. The new lab will replace one that was built 13 years ago at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. CDC officials say that lab is quickly wearing down.
By The News · 29 of March 2018 22:46:56
FILE - This Sep. 9, 2005 photo provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows the then-newly constructed 11-story Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory located at the CDC's Roybal Campus in Atlanta. In a government spending bill passed by Congress in March 2018, CDC officials got $480 million for a new lab to handle dangerous germs, replacing the aging one. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP), No available, FILE - This Sep. 9, 2005 photo provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows the then-newly constructed 11-story Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory located at the CDC's Roybal Campus in Atlanta. In a government spending bill passed by Congress in March 2018, CDC officials got $480 million for a new lab to handle dangerous germs, replacing the aging one. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP)

ATLANTA (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency has its money for a new lab to handle dangerous germs.

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked Congress for funds to build a new state-of-the art laboratory building.

CDC officials got $480 million for the endeavor. Money for the project was tucked inside a $1.3 trillion, 2,232-page government spending bill passed by Congress last week.

They say they need it to replace a 13-year-old building at the agency’s main campus in Atlanta, where scientists handle deadly and exotic germs like Ebola and smallpox. They say that building is wearing down.

The money is for the building and for a range of infrastructure changes. CDC officials did not provide a timetable for the work.