Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
World

U.S. Says Guantanamo Base Worker got Zika After Jamaica Trip

There have been no further reports of transmissions at the base

Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, responsible for transmitting dengue and Zika, photo: AP/Felipe Dana, File
1 year ago

MIAMI — A civilian contract worker has become the first person with a confirmed case of Zika on the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after being diagnosed with the mosquito-borne virus following a trip to Jamaica, the Navy said Friday.

The worker became infected while off the base and remains under medical supervision but now shows no symptoms of the illness, the Navy said in a statement.

A Navy spokesman, Bill Dougherty, said the person had recently traveled to nearby Jamaica but said no details about the individual could be disclosed because of U.S. medical privacy laws.

Hundreds of civilian contract workers are employed at Guantanamo. Many of them are foreign nationals from Jamaica who regularly travel back and forth from the base, though there are other nationalities as well.

The base, which occupies 45 square miles at the southeastern tip of Cuba, has a combined military and civilian population of about 6,000. There have been no reports of Zika transmitted on the installation.

Zika can cause fever, rash, joint pain and reddened eyes, though many of those infected show only mild symptoms or none at all. Pregnant women are considered most at risk because the virus has been linked to microcephaly, a birth defect in which a baby is born with an abnormally small head.

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Business

Kohl's to Start Accepting Amazon Returns ...

42 mins ago
World

Trump Lawyer: Senate Panel Delays Privat ...

56 mins ago
Business

Delta Ends Flights Between Guam and Japa ...

1 hour ago
World

Hurricane Maria Slams Dominica, now Mena ...

1 hour ago
Most Popular

Mancera Pays Tribute to 85 Earthquake in ...

By Notimex
Mexico

Hurricane Maria Smashes Dominica, Now Me ...

By The Associated Press
World

Global Shares Drift as Investors Pause A ...

By The Associated Press
Business

Rohingya Muslims being Wiped Off Myanmar ...

By The Associated Press
World

Mexican Independence Day: A Quick Guide

By Peter Appleby
Mexico