Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
World

No More Bongs! Big Ben to Fall Silent for 4 Years of Repairs

Steve Jaggs, keeper of the Great Clock, said Monday that the clock mechanism will be dismantled piece by piece and its four dials will be cleaned and repaired

A general view of Palace of Westminster and the Queen Elizabeth Tower which contains the bell known as 'Big Ben' in London, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, photo: AP/Alastair Grant
4 months ago

LONDON – The bongs will soon be gone.

Big Ben — the huge clock bell of Britain’s Parliament — will fall silent next week as a four-year restoration project gets underway.

The bongs of the iconic bell will be stopped after chiming noon on Aug. 21 to protect workers during a 29-million-pound ($38 million) repair project on the Queen Elizabeth Tower, which houses Big Ben and its clock. It isn’t due to resume regular service until 2021.

Steve Jaggs, keeper of the Great Clock, said Monday that the clock mechanism will be dismantled piece by piece and its four dials will be cleaned and repaired. The 13.5 British ton (15.1 U.S. ton, 13.7 metric tons) bell will be cleaned and checked for cracks.

Big Ben has been stopped several times since it first sounded in 1859, but the current restoration project will mark its longest period of silence.

Parliamentary officials say they will ensure that the bell still sounds on major occasions, such as New Year’s Eve and Remembrance Sunday.

The silence presents a problem for the BBC, which broadcasts the bongs every evening before the radio news through a microphone in the belfry.

After testing out the sound of substitute bells, the broadcaster said it will use a recording.

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Latest News

Fast-moving flames force people to flee ...

3 days ago
Entertainment

Prosecutors: No charges against conducto ...

3 days ago
Latest News

Southern snowfall isn't deep, but many f ...

3 days ago
Latest News

New Mexico school shooter left note plot ...

3 days ago
Most Popular

Up to 90 Million More Takata Airbag Infl ...

By The Associated Press
Business

German Toolmakers Open up Shop in San Mi ...

By Ricardo Castillo
Business

BP Estimates Cost of 2010 Gulf Oil Spill ...

By The Associated Press
Business

Liverpool Will Buy Suburbia from Wal-Mar ...

By The News
Business

Next Month Sees Increase in Gasoline Pri ...

By The News
Business