Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
World

London Library Makes World War II War Crimes Searches Easier

People will still have to visit the library in London or the U.S. Holocaust Museum to read the actual files

A view of a screen showing a United Nations' file from the Czechoslovak government in exile making its case for war crimes against Adolf Hitler, displayed at the Wiener Library for the Study of Holocaust & Genocide, in London, Friday, April 21, 2017, photo: AP/Alastair Grant
1 month ago

LONDON – Holocaust denial just got a little harder.

The Wiener Library for the Study of Holocaust & Genocide is making the United Nations’ files on World War II war crimes more accessible by allowing the general public to search an online catalog of the documents for the first time beginning Friday.

People will still have to visit the library in London or the U.S. Holocaust Museum to read the actual files.

The move is expected to increase interest in the archives of the United Nations War Crimes Commission, including the names of some 37,000 people identified as war criminals and security suspects. The commission operated in 1943-1949, but access to its records was restricted for political reasons in the early days of the Cold War.

“This is a whole hardware store of nails to hammer into the coffin of Holocaust denial,” said Dan Plesch, director of the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy at SOAS University of London. “It’s the first time it is practically accessible to the general public as the commission initially intended.”

Ben Barkow, Director of the Wiener Library for the Study of Holocaust & Genocide displays a United Nations’ file from the Czechoslovak government in exile making its case for war crimes against Adolf Hitler, in London, Friday, April 21, 2017. Photo: AP/Alastair Grant

Plesch and other researchers campaigned for the U.N. to open access to the files, which he used to write the book “Human Rights After Hitler.” In 2014, the U.S. Holocaust Museum made the archive freely available at its reading room in Washington. Prior to that, the records had been largely locked away at the United Nations, which granted only limited access.

“Nobody has paid any attention to it,” said Ben Barkow, director of the Wiener Library. “It has been hidden in plain sight.”

The documents detail Allied efforts to prosecute thousands of alleged Nazi and Japanese war criminals, from heads of state like Adolf Hitler to guards at the Auschwitz and Treblinka concentration camps.

The archive includes evidence gathered by local people who documented crimes long before the war ended and smuggled to Allied leaders in London.

“These people were meeting under aerial bombardment, dealing with affidavits smuggled out” of occupied countries, Plesch said. “Resistance movements were paying attention to the legal prosecution of oppressors.”

DANICA KIRKA

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Sports

Hornqvist set to Return for Pens, Fisher ...

43 mins ago
World

India Reports its First 3 Cases of The Z ...

58 mins ago
Sports

With Agassi Along for a Bit, Djokovic Op ...

1 hour ago
World

Honduras Stadium Stampede: 4 Fans Die; P ...

2 hours ago
Most Popular

U.S. Official Mulling Greatly Expanded A ...

By The Associated Press
World

Police Arrest 14th Man in Manchester Bom ...

By The Associated Press
World

Putin Visits France, Hopes to Mend Strai ...

By The Associated Press
World

Police Investigating Death of Australian ...

By Notimex
Mexico

Should Music Lovers try Apple Music or g ...

By María Trueba de Buen
Business