Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
World

Federal Judge Considers Fate of Texas 'Sanctuary Cities' Law

Opponents of the law argued that the law's vagueness is one of their biggest concerns

Merced Leyua (C) joins other protesters outside the Federal Courthouse to protest a new Texas "sanctuary cities" bill that aligns with the president's tougher stance on illegal immigration, Monday, June 26, 2017, in San Antonio, Texas, photo: AP/Eric Gay
4 months ago

SAN ANTONIO – A federal judge on Monday heard arguments before he decides whether a new Texas “sanctuary cities” crackdown backed by the Trump administration can take effect.

U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia appeared interested in how the law signed by Republican Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and scheduled to take effect in September would be enforced. The measure lets police ask people about immigration status during routine stops.

Garcia asked whether an officer could ask all passengers in a car about their immigration status and if local police could make their own immigration sweeps. Opponents of the law, including the cities of Houston and Dallas, argued that the law’s vagueness is one of their biggest concerns.

Protesters march to oppose a new Texas “sanctuary cities” bill that aligns with the president’s tougher stance on illegal immigration, Monday, June 26, 2017, in San Antonio, Texas. Photo: AP/Eric Gay

The Justice Department is helping Texas defend the law in a San Antonio court.

Protesters gathered outside the court holding signs including “No SB4 Ever,” and “Stop Separation of Families.”

Garcia is unlikely to rule immediately.

PAUL J. WEBER

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Sports

NBA Changes All-Star Game Format; Captai ...

2 weeks ago
Business

World Stocks Mixed as Investors await mo ...

2 weeks ago
World

Sweden Grants Temporary Asylum to 106-Ye ...

2 weeks ago
World

Puerto Rico Raises Hurricane's Official ...

2 weeks ago
Most Popular

EPN: Tragedy Has Brought Army and Citize ...

By The News
Mexico

Help Still Needed in Xochimilco

By The News
Mexico

September 19: What Mexico Refuses to Lea ...

By The News
Living

Mexicans March to Remember Tlatelolco '6 ...

By The News
Mexico

Argentine Wines, Beyond Malbec

By Thérèse Margolis
Living