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World

Extensive Cultural Damage Found in Historic Iraqi City

Intricate reliefs that once stood at the gates to the magnificent Assyrian palace lay in pieces

A part of carved stone slabs which were destroyed by the Islamic State militants, is seen at the ancient site of Nimrud some 19 miles (30 kilometers) southeast of Mosul, Iraq, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, photo: AP/Hussein Malla
9 months ago

NIMRUD, Iraq – Nearly a month into the fight to retake Mosul, government forces pushed Islamic State militants out of nearby Nimrud, home to some of Iraq’s richest archaeological treasures. And when soldiers finally surveyed the extremists’ destruction of the ancient sites, one said that those who carried it out “don’t have a place in humanity.”

In April 2015, the Islamic State group (I.S.) extremists released a shocking video that showed how they had hammered, bulldozed and blew up parts of the 13th century B.C. Assyrian capital in the Tigris River valley south of Mosul.

 Away from the front lines, Iraqi forces on Wednesday assessed the damage to the ancient site of Nimrud town. Iraqi troops entered Nimrud on Sunday in what was the most significant gain in several days for government forces. The late 1980s discovery of treasures in Nimrud's royal tombs was one of the 20th century's most significant archaeological finds. The government said the IS militants, who captured the site in June 2014, destroyed it the following year, using heavy military vehicles. Photo: AP /Hussein Malla

The late 1980s discovery of treasures in Nimrud’s royal tombs was one of the 20th century’s most significant archaeological finds. The government said the I.S. militants, who captured the site in June 2014, destroyed it the following year, using heavy military vehicles. Photo: AP/Hussein Malla

Iraqi officers accompanied journalists to the site Wednesday, wandering through the piles of rubble and snapping photos of the damage that U.N. officials had once called “a war crime.”

The Assyrian Ziggurat, nearly 3,000 years old and once one of the tallest surviving buildings of the ancient world, has been leveled. On palace walls, only small fragments of stone carvings remained. Two Assyrian winged-bull statues that once marked the palace entrance have been completely destroyed. In a palace doorway, four deep cracks defaced a large carving of an Assyrian guardian spirit.

Since they seized territory in Iraq and Syria in 2014, the I.S. militants, also known by the Arabic acronym Daesh, have destroyed other cultural treasures that they said promoted idolatry and violated their fundamentalist interpretation of Islamic law.

“This was done by people who don’t have a place in humanity,” said Maj. Gen. Dhiaa al-Saadi, the deputy commander of Iraqi ground forces, as he surveyed the ruins.

Shortly after portions of the site were excavated in 1845, some carved slabs and massive statues were removed and sent to the British Museum in London where they remain to this day. The Iraqi national museum in Baghdad also houses winged bulls from the Nimrud site.

As Iraqi forces have clawed back territory from I.S. since the grinding operation to retake Mosul began Oct. 17, authorities have found evidence of mass graves, torture and brutal prisons. They fear they will also find even more destruction of ancient treasures marking the country’s rich history.

“We have information that all of the archaeological places in Mosul have already been destroyed,” al-Saadi said.

Archaeologists and government officials have yet to visit the site to conduct a proper assessment, according to Iraqi officers at the scene.

Al-Jabouri, the local tribal fighter, said he doesn’t believe any amount of restoration can repair what’s been lost.

“But we’ve heard that only 30 percent of this site has been [properly excavated],” he said, “so maybe there is more still beneath the ground.”

 Away from the front lines, Iraqi forces on Wednesday assessed the damage to the ancient site of Nimrud town. The late 1980s discovery of treasures in Nimrud's royal tombs was one of the 20th century's most significant archaeological finds. Photo: AP /Hussein Malla

Away from the front lines, Iraqi forces on Wednesday assessed the damage to the ancient site of Nimrud town. The late 1980s discovery of treasures in Nimrud’s royal tombs was one of the 20th century’s most significant archaeological finds. Photo: AP/Hussein Malla

Inside Mosul, meanwhile, heavy fighting raged in the eastern Tahrir neighborhood as Iraqi forces pushed deeper into the city. An I.S. suicide car bomber rammed an Abrams tank belonging to the Iraqi army, disabling it in a massive explosion.

Families fled their homes amid the fighting in the densely populated district, but some were caught up in the clashes. A three-year-old girl was killed and five others were wounded from mortar shells fired by militants into the street.

In the same district, Iraqi forces arrested four people they described as militants — two Iraqis and two Arabs from another country. They were bound, blindfolded and locked inside a Humvee.

West of Mosul, a state-sanctioned Shiite militia taking part in the operation to retake the northern city advanced toward Tal Afar, a town on the road to Syria that had a Shiite majority population before it fell to predominantly Sunni Islamic State group militants in 2014.

Fierce clashes were underway outside the Tal Afar military airport, said Hezbollah Brigades spokesman Jaafar al-Husseini, without elaborating.

Later Wednesday, Youssef al-Kilabi, the spokesman for the Shiite militias’ umbrella group, told Iraqi broadcaster al-Iraqiya in a telephone call that the militias had taken Tal Afar’s airport. The claim could not be independently confirmed.

SUSANNAH GEORGE
QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA

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