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Opinion
Antonio Navalón
Antonio Navalón It Was Poorly Done A police officer isn't a person in uniform anymore, but a suspect in uniform
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I don’t know what is more surprising about Interior Secretary Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong’s declaration about Felipe Calderón’s anti-crime politics: how long it took him to realize it or the moment in which it happened.

For a long time and after more than 100,000 deaths brought on by the war on drugs, we have know than it was all done badly.

In our beloved country, a cradle of so many unexplainable things, the most important and interesting thing is knowing that anything can happen here.

For example, it was never clear why the government ignored the 27,000 disappearances registered between 2006 and 2012. In any other country, the government would have been required to do inventory and limit responsibilities.

In this sense, the question in obvious. Why is justice not served here? Why do we prefer to continue advancing toward a situation in which the Interior Secretary — at the cost of human rights associations and their pending cases — only assures that everything was poorly done.

In addition, the deputies and senators need to be conscience that they are also responsible for what is happening, by making laws that legally protect what was poorly done.

The central theme continues to be the Army, because Calderón took them from their barracks and put them onto the street and no one did anything to stop them.

Because at the end of the day, Felipe Calderón gave the order. The Army had the right to assume that what he was doing was legal, because the boss gave the order.

The problem is that now, recounting the deaths, disappearances and abuses, it’s very easy, and even demagogic, — as show by the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College case — to begin to blame people in uniform. Because here a police officer isn’t a person in uniform anymore, but a suspect in uniform.

And the only respectable people in uniform left in our country are those in the Armed Forces, and because of this it is important that Osorio Chong made his declaration to fix politics.

This isn’t just because it was a bad policy and a bad decision when faced with drug traffickers. It is because it was also a decision when faced with the armed forces and the country.

Now it’s the government’s turn to solve the corresponding problem, because the question is very clear. When will the law be enforced?

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