Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
Business

Mexico Nissan Defends Tsuru After Testers Call it Dangerous

The Tsuru has no standard air bags. Mexico's auto regulations require cars to have little more than brakes, tires and rear-view mirrors.

Taxista Mexico City, photo: Capital Media
2 years ago

MEXICO CITY — Nissan’s Mexico subsidiary on Monday defended the 1990s-era Tsuru compact car that it sells in Mexico after testers called the vehicle dangerous.

The warning came in a new study by the Latin New Car Assessment Program, known as Latin NCAP.

A taxi in Mexico City Photo: Capital Media/Victoria Valtierra

A Mexico City taxi in this file photo
Photo: Capital Media/Victoria Valtierra

The Tsuru got zero stars in crash tests. The study said that “for most of the years analyzed, the Nissan Tsuru experienced the highest fatality score” of any vehicle sold in Mexico.

Nissan said the Tsuru “meets the safety regulations in the markets where it is sold.” It said the car “is one of the most popular sub-compact vehicles in Mexico due to its proved affordability, durability and reliability.”

The Tsuru has no standard air bags. Mexico’s auto regulations require cars to have little more than brakes, tires and rear-view mirrors.

Latin NCAP said the model is sold in parts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Central and South America.

Testers said 4,102 people died in Tsurus between 2007 and 2012 in Mexico.

“By continuing to sell the Tsuru in Mexico, Nissan are exploiting the lack of crash test standards and exposing their customers to an entirely avoidable risk of death and serious injury,” said David Ward, secretary general of the British-based Global NCAP. “Nissan should do the right thing and withdraw from sale of this sub-standard and unsafe model.”

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Business

Female workers sue McCormick & Schmick's ...

2 days ago
Entertainment

Trump says female senator 'would do anyt ...

2 days ago
Science

Paris hosts major climate summit _ and i ...

2 days ago
Living

Late-night host Kimmel holds son, pleads ...

3 days ago
Most Popular

French PM says Disputed Labour Bill Open ...

By The Associated Press
Business

New Delivery App Rappi Says It's Not Sel ...

By Caitlin Donohue
Business

Global Stocks Mixed as Investors await T ...

By The Associated Press
Business

Google Agrees to Pay $335 Million in Ita ...

By The Associated Press
Business

General Electric CEO Immelt Stepping Dow ...

By The Associated Press
Business