Navigation
Suscribe
Menu Search Facebook Twitter
Search Close
Menu ALL SECTIONS
  • Capital Coahuila
  • Capital Hidalgo
  • Capital Jalisco
  • Capital Morelos
  • Capital Oaxaca
  • Capital Puebla
  • Capital Quintana Roo
  • Capital Querétaro
  • Capital Veracruz
  • Capital México
  • Capital Michoacán
  • Capital Mujer
  • Reporte Índigo
  • Estadio Deportes
  • The News
  • Efekto
  • Diario DF
  • Capital Edo. de Méx.
  • Green TV
  • Revista Cambio
Radio Capital
Pirata FM
Capital Máxima
Capital FM
Digital
Prensa
Radio
TV
X
Newsletter
Facebook Twitter
X Welcome! Subscribe to our newsletter and receive news, data, statistical and exclusive promotions for subscribers
Business

Confusion Hits Consumer Market over U.S. Ban of Kaspersky

Kaspersky has denied any unethical ties with Russia or any government

This Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, file photo shows a sign above the headquarters of Kaspersky Lab in Moscow, photo: AP/Pavel Golovkin, File
5 days ago

NEW YORK – Worries rippled through the consumer market for antivirus software after the U.S. government banned federal agencies from using Kaspersky Labs software on Wednesday. Best Buy and Office Depot said they will no longer sell software made by the Russian company, although one security researcher said most consumers don’t need to be alarmed.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security cited concerns about possible ties between unnamed Kaspersky officials and the Kremlin and Russian intelligence services. The department also noted that Russian law might compel Kaspersky to assist the government in espionage.

Kaspersky has denied any unethical ties with Russia or any government. It said Wednesday that its products have been sold at Best Buy for a decade. Kaspersky software is widely used by consumers in both free and paid versions, raising the question of whether those users should follow the U.S. government’s lead.

Nicholas Weaver, a computer security researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, called the U.S. government decision “prudent;” he had argued for such a step in July . But he added by email that “for most everybody else, the software is fine.”

 

The biggest risk to U.S. government computers is if Moscow-based Kaspersky is subject to “government-mandated malicious update,” Weaver wrote this summer.

Kaspersky products accounted for about 5.5 percent of anti-malware software products worldwide, according to research firm Statista.

Another expert, though, suggested that consumers should also uninstall Kaspersky software to avoid any potential risks. Michael Sulmeyer, director of a cybersecurity program at Harvard, noted that antivirus software has deep access to one’s computer and network.

“Voluntarily introducing this kind of Russian software in a geopolitical landscape where the U.S.-Russia relationship is not good at all, I think would be assuming too much risk,” he said. “There are plenty of alternatives out there.”

Sulmeyer also said retailers should follow Best Buy Co.’s lead and stop selling the software.

Office Depot Inc. announced Thursday that it will stop selling the software. Amazon, which also sells Kaspersky software, declined to comment. Staples, another seller of the software, didn’t return a message seeking comment.

Various U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies and several congressional committees are investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Kaspersky said it is not subject to the Russian laws cited in the directive and said information received by the company is protected in accordance with legal requirements and stringent industry standards, including encryption.

JOSEPH PISANI
RYAN NAKASHIMA

Comments Whatsapp Twitter Facebook Share
More From The News
Business

Kohl's to Start Accepting Amazon Returns ...

38 mins ago
World

Trump Lawyer: Senate Panel Delays Privat ...

52 mins ago
Business

Delta Ends Flights Between Guam and Japa ...

56 mins ago
World

Hurricane Maria Slams Dominica, now Mena ...

59 mins ago
Most Popular

Mancera Pays Tribute to 85 Earthquake in ...

By Notimex
Mexico

Hurricane Maria Smashes Dominica, Now Me ...

By The Associated Press
World

Global Shares Drift as Investors Pause A ...

By The Associated Press
Business

Rohingya Muslims being Wiped Off Myanmar ...

By The Associated Press
World

Mexican Independence Day: A Quick Guide

By Peter Appleby
Mexico